Executive Leadership Is A Lofty Goal

Executive Leadership Is A Lofty Goal

Executive Leadership is a lofty goal. One familiar challenge is when a technical resource particularly good at their current role is promoted into leadership roles. Along the way, the need to expand their focus from a technical to management perspective may go unnoticed until they reach the Department head or CIO level. Let’s hear more.

Mary Patry 
IT Executive Advisor and Leadership Coach   
 480.393.0722 (AZ) 
 Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com 
LinkedIn: http:// www.linkedin.com/in/mleonardopatry 

Let’s Talk sponsored by ITeffectivity.com an IT Executive Coaching and Advisory practice targeting CIO’s challenge of leading and delivering business solutions with a focus on effective people and process capabilities. Discover the possibilities by scheduling a complimentary strategy session with Mary Patry. 

20 Questions to Evaluate Your Team’s Alignment

20 Questions to Evaluate Your Team’s Alignment

Despite vast resources exclaiming the ease of building effective teams, leading and engaging teams remains a significant challenge in most workplaces. The added distraction of mobile devices and multi-tasking habits adds to the challenge. The following are 20 questions team leaders and participants should be asking in order to maximize their alignment and effectiveness:

  1. What is the specific, measurable goal that defines your team’s success?
  2. How aligned are the values of each team member with each other and the organization?
  3. How does the team recruit top-notch people?
  4. How clear is the value of the organization to each employee?
  5. How clear are expectations about what every team member is supposed to be doing and achieving?
  6. How well do team members know and trust each other?
  7. Do the team members offer to help each other without having to be asked?
  8. How clear is the path to results?
  9. What opportunities are there for early and ongoing small wins?
  10. How well does the team anticipate, avoid, and mitigate risks?
  11. Is communication open, honest, and transparent among team members?
  12. How well does the team acknowledge each other as well as celebrate success?
  13. How effectively does the team clear up and move forward after setbacks?
  14. Does the team know the conversations to move things forward from vision to result?
  15. Do the leaders of the teams effectively motivate each team member and each other?
  16. Do the leaders of the teams spend time with each other as a group outside of the office?
  17. How well does the team handle transitions of team members out of the team?
  18. How well does the team help new team members ramp-up and achieve performance quickly?
  19. How often do team members instinctly help each other without having to be asked?
  20. How effectively does the team learn about how it can work together better?

These are crucial questions, and the answers are not always obvious. Which of the questions resonate with you?

Even if members of a team think they are discussing the same topic, often they are having a very different conversation. While one team member might be talking about vision, another is asking about strategy, another is focused on evaluating ideas, and still another is frustrated that no one is committing to specific action steps. Also, some team members aren’t saying anything at all or are making negative comments.

Are all the members of your team engaged and on the same page?

The next time you have a team meeting, write the names of your team members across this page. Every time someone speaks, check off what kind of conversation they are having. Then you will able to see whether your team is truly aligned and on the same page, or not paying attention at all. You will also see who is dominating the conversation (often the most vocal is the one to lead a team down the wrong path), and who is disengaged.

To learn more, I invite you to download a complimentary resource – Team Meeting Assessment It is a simple assessment to evaluate the conversations different team members are having and whether those conversations move the team forward, backward, or keep them at a standstill. I guarantee it will open your awareness and generate new ideas about making your teams more effective and efficient.

Click here to download team engagement assessment tool: Team Meeting Assessment

Until next time, have an effective week!

Mary

Mary Patry 
IT Executive Advisor and Leadership Coach   
 480.393.0722 (AZ) 
 Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com 
LinkedIn: http:// www.linkedin.com/in/mleonardopatry 

Let’s Talk sponsored by ITeffectivity.com an IT Executive Coaching and Advisory practice targeting CIO’s challenge of leading and delivering business solutions with a focus on effective people and process capabilities. Discover the possibilities by scheduling a complimentary strategy session with Mary Patry. 

Networking Beyond Your Current Vision of Yourself

Networking Beyond Your Current Vision of Yourself

You’ve all heard it. You might have even said it, “I don’t have time to network,” “Ugh, networking is not in my comfort zone,” “I am not good with small talk,” “I don’t have anything to say that anyone would care to hear. 

Yes, that may all be true – until the day you need it. Networking is particularly challenging for IT people. Let’s face it, many of us are introverts, and many of our non-IT friends don’t always understand what we do for a living. Regardless of your discomfort with networking, it is highly likely that someday you will need or want to find a new job.   

I am certain you are aware that networking is one potential path to finding a new job. However, did you know it might be the best way to get the job done? (The job of finding a new job, that is.) Some estimate that upwards of 85 percent of open positions are filled through networking. If you’re looking for work, it might be better to put your time into building your professional network rather than poring over all of the online listings.  

Is it possible that networking might be the best way to find a new job?  I believe so 

Let me offer you an approach that may resonate, and that is to take a projectbased approach to the network.   

Traditional networking advice suggests that you look at your current network and think about how to nurture your relationships. The problem is that this is a purely relationship based approach and looks at who you know and have known. It is based on your strategic vision for where you want to go in your career. 

A more powerful way to think about your network is to start with a vision of where you want to be in your career in three to five years, and then work backward from there. Sound familiar? It should. It is how we build a strategic plan.  

To make this more concrete, follow these steps: 

  1. Take a moment to envision your best possible career in five years. Where do you want to be, what do you want to be known for? 
  2. Who will the people be that you know, and who will know if you achieve your vision? Don’t limit yourself; get creative! Think about leaders in the IT field locally and globally who you admire. Who do you want to have coffee with?  
  3. Put yourself into that future space and work backward to write the story about how you came to know these people. Which associations did you join? What conferences did you attend? What assignments did you complete? What leaders did you follow? Who did you look to for introductions? How did you develop new skills and abilities?
  4. Where do you need to be to interact with the people in your story? What do you have to do now to show up differently to attract the types of people you need to make the story come true?  
  5. What are the key steps you can take right now to start building your ideal network and moving powerfully into the future? What would it mean to you to take these steps?  How important is your vision for you? What are the barriers and who can you look to for guidance in knocking them down?  

This approach is a new way of looking at networking. Instead of starting where you are, you start from the future and work backward. 

This “from the future” networking can be scary for many because it may mean that you have to reinvent yourself and show up differently than you have been.  

It has been said that we are who we hang out with. That is true, and the same is true for our network of professional relationships. If you want to be associated with top-tier professionals, you must be one yourself, and you can become one by choosing to hang out with these types of people and choosing to model yourself after them 

 The strategic network approach outlined here forces you to think about how you show up now as a professional and as a leader. Next week, I will expand on networking techniques that will help you in your quest to achieve your strategic career goals. You can do it. I know you can.  

Mary Patry 
IT Executive Advisor and Leadership Coach   
 480.393.0722 (AZ) 
 Mary.Patry@iteffectivity.com 
LinkedIn: http:// www.linkedin.com/in/mleonardopatry 

Let’s Talk sponsored by ITeffectivity.com an IT Executive Coaching and Advisory practice targeting CIO’s challenge of leading and delivering business solutions with a focus on effective people and process capabilities. Discover the possibilities by scheduling a complimentary strategy session with Mary Patry.